Quick Change

How quickly the weather can change. I was away for a few days and got home just in time. Imagine if I’d had to drive home in this snow.

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Last week this red-shafted northern flicker was just checking out the fence. At that time he could still enjoy some bare ground to pick over for grubs.

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And he had time to show off his lovely markings.

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But today with the snow I was pleased to see him return and find the suet blocks by the feeder.

He dropped one of the pieces of suet …

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And then had to sit on the ground to finish his meal.

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Do you feed the birds? Have you seen any special ones?

22 thoughts on “Quick Change

  1. Gladys

    Lovely pictures. The snow is very pretty, although difficult for the birds. Even so, I welcome the snow for skiing and for replenishing our lakes.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      And I suppose it’s good for the run-off later when the creeks need water for the salmon fry. So maybe it’s a good thing in the long run. Meanwhile the poor little birds have a hard time, unless they live near someone’s feeder. And yes, I bet the ski hill people are glad to be able to get on with a late season at last!!

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  2. bulldog

    These are brilliant photos… and yes I do feed whatever is prepared to come to the “feed tree”, but we have a problem as a pair of Indian myna birds are nesting in our roof and they chase all and every bird away even if they aren’t interested in their food…. the quandary is that the Indian myna is an invasive species not natural to our part of the world… brought here as pets so many years ago and now breeding like flies. What to do? Shoot them that their young die of starvation or wait for the young to fly and then try somehow to chase them? I can’t shoot them, would break my heart, but I do hate them for chasing all the indigenous birds…

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      I know that feeling exactly. They all have a right to live, but why do they have to be so greedy and take over? The starlings are much like that here. Cowbirds too. I once watched a yellow-rumped warbler feeding a cowbird chick that was bigger than she was. The mother cowbird had laid her egg in the warbler’s nest and then taken off to live the good life while the warbler’s own babies died from being crowded out by the big lout of a cowbird chick. Makes me wish I could play God.

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  3. Ursula

    Yes, I feed them every winter. I don´t know what kind of birds they are but they are all over the place where people have feeders for them. Once in a while a woodpecker is coming to the feeder too. I love them all. Your pics of the flicker are excellent!

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      Thanks, Ursula. I love watching visitors that come to the birdfeeder. I still can’t get the pictures as clear as I want them to be because often I have to take them through a window or use the zoom without time to use the tripod, but I guess it’s better to snap the picture I can get than prepare for the one I can’t get because the bird flew away in the meantime.

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  4. bentehaarstad

    Yes, I feed birds, but there are not so many this year, because there is very little snow around my part of the country and the birds are not that desperate for food. Mainly tits and sparrows now. I usually drive in snow like this for months, but not this year.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      Driving in snow is okay if you’re used to it, but here on the coast, most people are not used to it and they’re terrible drivers when there’s snow – so lots of accidents. Best to stay home and wait for rain. Of course you can’t do that in the snowy climates. Good for you, for feeding the birds, whatever kind they may be.

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  5. Lynne

    Yes, I “always” feed the birds although I have never seen a Northern Flicker in my neighbourhood! Beautiful photographs (even the snow looks “lovely”).
    x

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  6. Luanne

    What a gorgeous bird (and photo)! I loved to feed the birds when I lived in Michigan. Then, in California, I learned that the bird seed was sending rats into my attic (which led to their sometimes demise), so I had to stop feeding the birds. Now in Arizona I don’t need to feed the birds because there is plenty for them to eat, and even hummingbirds abound because of the flowers.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      You’re lucky to live in a place with year-round flowers. Here, we have definite lengthy wintery stretches. It’s not usually so bad with snow, but even the usual wind and rain is hard on the birds. I understand about the rats! I wouldn’t hang a feeder near the woodpile! Thanks for visiting, Luanne.

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  7. Lori D

    Lovely bird photos. I just drafted a blog about Florida birds, but not sure when it’ll go up yet. I may need your comment on naming them. I have no clue on some.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      I’m looking forward to seeing your post. Don’t know how much help I’ll be with the identification of Florida birds, but if they’re migratory I may recognize some from here. I’ll do what I can.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      Flickers spend a lot of time on the trunks of trees and when they’re on a fir tree trunk, the mottled colouring helps a lot to camouflage them. They also spend a fair bit of time on bare ground, picking holes in the dirt to get bugs, and there again, they blend in well. The colourful marking are all underneath, so they can be useful for private showings to their mates 😉

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