wordsfromanneli

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Uplifting

Another year, another haulout. Earlier this year, you may remember that the Captain put on a new propeller while the boat was on the grid. That means it was sitting on a cement pad near shore. He waited for the tide to go out and let the boat settle on the pad. Then he had to work quickly to exchange the props before the tide came in again. At high tide the boat floated again and he could drive off the grid.

Now, weeks later, it is time to do more serious work on the boat to get the propeller shaft lined up and the propeller balanced and a few other jobs. For this work, the boat needs to be in a shipyard, on dry land, where it can be worked on without the pressure of worrying what the tide is doing.

I’m always fascinated by the way huge boats can be lifted right out of the water and parked in a lot.

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A travel lift drives over this “bay” and its belts will hang in the water.

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In the photo below, you can see the belts that will cradle the boat.

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Here is the travel lift, ready to drive alongside the “bay.” Once it is in place, the boat slides into the slot over top of the belts.

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Then the heavy lifting starts.

newcastle liftout 2015 -1

newcastle liftout 2015

Once the keel clears ground level, the lift drives it over to its place in the parking lot. Braces and beams are put in place to prop up the boat, and then the work begins. Among all the other jobs, the hull is cleaned up. The old sludge is powerwashed off and new anti-fouling paint is slapped on. Long hours of work lie ahead. The boat will be sparkling by the time it leaves the shipyard, but not until the Captain feels his age.

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I used to think theĀ 39-foot troller was a pretty good size, but looking at it beside this pleasure boat, it looks quite small. It’s big enough when you have to do the hull cleaning job though.