Mystery Bird

We have several birds from the woodpecker family around here, but I have never seen this one. My first thought was a redheaded woodpecker (for obvious reasons) but they have a definite white wing patch, solid black back, and solid white front..

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This fellow had a mottled front and specks of white on the black back. It could be an immature bird, but still….

Also note the light patch at the base of the beak by his eye. I would love to know what this bird is, so if anyone has any ideas, please enlighten me. It was quite happy to stay put for a long while and peck at this maple tree. Judging by the holes in the tree, he has been busy. He was about the size of a robin – maybe a tiny bit bigger.

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23 thoughts on “Mystery Bird

    • That was the closest picture ID I could find too, but I see that Juanita in the next comment has nailed it. I looked that one up and it fits. Red-headed sapsucker. Thanks for your close guess, Terry.

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    • I looked it up and you are RIGHT, Juanita! It also says that the red-breasted sapsucker is the only woodpecker with a white stripe on the side and this one has the beginnings of it. Very good, Girl!

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    • We found it! Red-breasted sapsucker. Juanita guessed red-headed sapsucker, and it turned out to be red-breasted, but a sapsucker. The picture on the Wiki sapsucker page identifies it for sure. He was a cute little guy. Not shy at all. Made me wish he’d come closer so I could get a better look at him. He was pretty high up the tree.

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  1. Cute little guy! There are more of them than one would think.

    I’ve had a lot of help with bird-ID:ing from a Flickr group, called just that: help with bird-ID. When I’ve exhausted all other sources, I turn to them, and they always deliver.

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  2. I never knew there are so many variations of the woodpecker until we put out a suet feeder this winter. I swear we get one like your gorgeous photos here. So, a red-headed sapsucker, huh? Fun name, adorable bird. She/he is still around with us this summer. xo

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    • Actually, it’s called a red-breasted sapsucker (although there’s not much red on the breast). I think that on the east coast you get a lot more colourful birds than we get out here. That’s why I get so excited when I see something with a bit of colour. I love seeing birds up close (except for crows).

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  3. I really liked how you found an amazing bird and beautiful capture in this photograph, Anneli! I am in awe of this fantastic photograph! Thanks for letting us know what kind of bird he is. I usually call all the handsome and colorful ones a boy! I hope you have a great weekend and let us know how the Captain is doing out on his boat, too. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Robin. I was really happy to have seen this bird. As Pam said in her comment, she sees them more often, but out here, it’s not that common to see them. Big thrill for me. Captain is doing great, but the weather has been rough.

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      • I am so sorry that the weather has been rough, Anneli for the Captain on his trowler, (I remember your giving us a description and comparison and think that his boat is not a “trawler” but is the other! Anyway, are the waves high? Do fish get caught despite the weather? When I dated a fisherman, he liked the muddy, murky water. When I was out with my Dad, he liked clear water and smooth rowboating! We mainly dropped a line, liked to sit under the stars and talk. . . ❤ Take care and again, the bird photos are gorgeous!

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  4. It’s a troller and they fish several perlon lines with lures off three main steel cables on each side of the boat.Sometimes you can still catch fish when the weather is bad, but there’s more chance of the gear getting tangled. It’s definitely easier to fish when the water is calm. Rowboating is about my speed! I’m happy that you liked the bird in this post.

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