Trilliums and Trilliums of Them

They used to be more prolific here, but now houses cover the places they used to grow. We used to love saying there were trilliums and trilliums of trilliums. I was “trilled” to find these three.From under last year’s dried up ferns this special flower popped up.  Not many flowers in this world have three petals.

One thing I hadn’t noticed before taking this picture today are the lines on the petals. In the same way a leaf has lines, so the petals have lines, but these are part of a much more intricate  design. You can see the lines better if you click on the photo to enlarge it. Don’t forget to click the back arrow to come back. Don’t want to lose you!

Wikipedia says: The trillium was formerly treated in the family Trilliaceae or trillium family, a part of the Liliales or lily order.

However it doesn’t say what it is treated as now. Is it still considered to belong to the lilies?

The fleur-de-lys (lily flower) is a famous French symbol. Again, the three petals. I wonder if a trillium would be a good substitute for this emblem.

Did you see the bug on the trillium in the first photo?

Big black bug sits on my petal.

Wish I were a stinging nettle.

Shivering in the breeze I shake it

But it grips and I can’t make it

Get. Off. Me.

 

25 thoughts on “Trilliums and Trilliums of Them

  1. I should have seen these photos before I finished the trillium on my quilt. Can’t change it now but probably no one will notice anyway.
    Lovely photos as usual.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Anneli, I like the design on the trilliums, thank you for pointing this out. I had never noticed this.
    My Mom used to point out a few different kinds of wildflowers. It makes me happy you have trilliums up North, too. Violets, spring beauties, trilliums, May apples and Johnny Jump Up’s to name a few. . . Mom’s favorite was the Lilies of the Valley. They have such a pretty scent and look like tiny bells.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love finding trillium! Almost like finding a 4-leaf clover. In some states, like Vermont (where I grew up), people are not allowed to pick trillium because of its endangered native plant status, and picking them damages the plant. They’re something special!

    Like

    • Yes! I was always under the impression that this was a rule here too – no picking or transplanting. One day I was coming back from a day in the woods and I saw in front of me, the pickup truck of a local environmentalist with a load of them that filled the back of her truck. I guess she thought she was saving them and was going to plant them elsewhere. Probably killed the lot of them.

      Like

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