Monthly Archives: January 2018

Super Moon Smiles for the Camera

Yesterday, Jan. 30, 2018, the moon was as close to the earth as it would get until next month, on Feb. 27, 2018. Because it is about 26,000 miles closer to the earth on these days, the moon looks a bit bigger to us. The time when the moon is closest to the earth is called perigee.

This super moon we had yesterday, also happened to pass behind the shadow of the earth. Basically, the moon was hiding from the sun behind the earth. When it was eclipsed by the earth, the moon was only visible as a dark shadow. As  it disappeared and when it appeared again, we could see slivers of the edge of the moon.

The slight reddish tinge of the moon was made by the scattering of light by tiny particles in the earth’s atmosphere, so they also called this special super moon  a blood moon. As if that weren’t enough, when this lunar eclipse happened, it was also the second time we had a full moon in one month (the moon was full on January 1 and again on January 31),  making it a blue moon. So this moon event has more titles than a royal muckety-muck. It was a “super blue blood moon.”

I took this picture this morning about 5:45. No tripod, as I hadn’t planned ahead to take the photo. Maybe next time … but I understand it will be a very long time before all these events coincide again. Not sure where I’ll be in 2037.

A Parting Shot

I didn’t learn about the possible connection between “a parting shot” and “a Parthian shot” until just a few years ago. It seems that the Parthians who lived in a region in the northeast of what is now Iran, had a sneaky technique that worked very successfully for them in battle. They might be outnumbered four to one, but as long as they had a constant supply of arrows (which they always brought along to the battles), they could put their horsemanship and archery skills to good use.

Their tactic was to fake a retreat, understandable when they were outnumbered, and as the enemy fell out of their organized formation and pursued them, the Parthians turned to shoot at them with their large supply of arrows, and ended up winning many a battle this way.

This one (and many more) last shot as they (supposedly) fled, came to be their trademark “Parthian Shot,” and some believe that our modern expression “parting shot” derives its origin in this Parthian tactic.

Well, winter has taken a page from the Parthian history books and given us a Parthian shot this morning. After several warmish, springlike days, we woke up to this early morning scene.

Emma jumped up to her usual seat on the back of the couch to watch her favourite nature show of passing rabbits and eagles, and was dumbfounded. I heard her say, “What the …?”

The valley was socked in with a snow cloud.

But when the sun rose, a promising pink glow said, “Don’t worry, I’ll melt the snow off that willow in the front right of your picture. The pussywillows will still be there, unharmed.”

 

The birds are so happy that I refilled the feeders yesterday before it snowed.

 

Hang in there. Spring will come one day. I’m not going to be taken in by winter’s Parthian shot and go out there to shovel snow that will melt by tomorrow.

Wild Winds

For days and days and days and days we lived in an atmosphere as thick as pea soup.

And then the wind picked up. It blew the fog away and delivered some hefty, hefty rain clouds. My house is near the end of that spit of land on the left, in that gap between the trees, but looking out the other way towards Comox Bay.  The beach in these photos is not far away but it gets hammered much harder by the wind.

See the foam that has piled up on the beach like whipping cream that has blown off the frothing tops of the waves.

Anyone for a little boat ride today? Surfing might be okay except for the many rocks on this beach.

This lonely seagull probably can’t decide where he wants to go but it doesn’t matter because it’s unlikely he’ll get there today anyway. He will go where the winds take him.

More foam collects on the beach. At night those fish who have legs come ashore and gather this whipping cream to put on their “sponge” cake for dessert.

“Careful,” hollers the Captain. “Stay off those logs. They’re “slicker’n snot on a doorknob,” he announces crudely.

“Aye, aye, Cap’n! Aaarrrh haaarrrh.

Brisk and wild and wonderful

The sea spray soaks my face

I gasp for air that whooshes past

With giant strength and pace.

I lift the camera in the wind

Don’t want to lose my grip

I brace myself against the sway

As if I’m on a ship.

The lens is spattered, droplets run,

No way to keep it dry.

I click the pictures anyway

And whoop and gasp and cry.

The wind is strong,  I need to hold 

The car door safely tight.

I ease inside and yell out, “Wow!

I thought I might take flight.”

 

 

A Big Birthday

Some of you may remember a post I did about my mother-in-law, Myrtle, about a year and a half ago telling about her amazing walking achievements. In her 90s, she still walks about three miles a day and does all the  exercise programs available in her retirement home. To read the post, in case you missed it or want to refresh your memory, here is the link:

https://wordsfromanneli.com/2016/07/29/walk-across-canada/

Today, Myrtle is 96 years old and still going strong. She knows that the secret to staying young is to keep moving.

Here is a photo of her outside her residence door just before Christmas 2017. I think she looks great.

Happy birthday, Myrtle.

96 years young today.

 

 

 

 

A Good Year Ahead

It was such a beautiful morning as the sun came up today on the first day of January, 2018. I hope it’s a sign of what a good year it promises to be.

Thank you, blogging friends, for visiting my blog posts and clicking Likes and commenting. Without you, there would be no point in posting anything.

I wish you all the very best of health and happiness for the coming year.