Sawing Logs

Two years ago at a quilting retreat, I had finished my planned small projects and had time left over to mess around a bit.  I sewed a few left over odds and ends together, making a square in the log cabin pattern.

The strips of fabric are like logs of all different lengths,  stacked into a “log cabin” of sorts. I made 14 of these squares with the shortest “log” being 1 inch and the longest, 9 inches. I thought it was a good way to use up scraps of fabric that would otherwise not be good for much.

Then I had a brainwave: I could put the squares together and make a quilt!

Okay. How many squares would I need? I had a quilt at home with a different design of squares. It was  10 squares across and 11 down, but was a tiny bit small for the bed.

I could do the same thing and add a border.

Great idea. So how many squares would I need to make? 10 times 11 = 110.

I had 14 done (and it had taken me some time).

Only 96 more to go. Eeeeeeee!!! What was I thinking?

But I had already made 14 and I had the “logs” cut out for many more. Too late to abandon the plan.

…. Last night, almost two years later,  I finished the monstrosity. Now, if I snore, I can say I’m sawing logs.

60 thoughts on “Sawing Logs

  1. Gladys

    Congratulations! It’s always such a relief to finish a huge project. It looks good. Don’t saw too many logs or you may saw the quilt into pieces and then you have to start all over again.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      Actually, now that you mention it, it may have been longer than two years. I’ve been going to the retreats for about three years now, I think. I made mostly bags and a couple of table runners last time.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      Quilters once in a while comment on how they would never get a decent wage out of selling a quilt if you counted the materials and the hours spent. But a lot of love goes into making most of the projects.

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  2. Debra

    That’s no small accomplishment! It’s lovely and congratulations. I have so many “pieces of projects” that have never been completed. I admire your tenacity! And I admire your final product. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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        1. wordsfromanneli Post author

          I used to knit and crochet a lot more but then the quilting took over and it’s very time-consuming. But I know what you mean about time to think. And that’s a good thing. We don’t usually have enough time just to think, and not be bombarded by so many things going on around us all the time.

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      The squares ended up being 8 and a half inches. The border is 4 inches. So 10 squares across (85 inches) + 8 in. of border = 93 in. for the width. Add another 8 and a half in. for the length which was 11 squares long (101.5″). And yes, it was put to rest and passed the test. 😉

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    1. wordsfromanneli Post author

      Tnx, Diana. It does get a bit mind-boggling after doing a few squares, and yet there is no going back once you are well into it. You wonder about your sanity at times. If you quilt, you know the feeling of relief when you finish a big project like this. (I’m sticking to place mats and tote bags for a while.)

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  3. Ursula Kurz

    With this beautifully work covering you during the winters, you will always sleep real good. You deserve it! For my feeling you are a hero! I could never do it, never!

    Liked by 1 person

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