Quilt Show in Cumberland, BC

The local quilting guild  put on a quilt show on the long weekend in May. I tried to snap a few pictures and here are four of them.  Some of the visitors inadvertently became part of this post. Hard to take a picture of the quilts in a crowded room. More photos to come in future blog posts.

This sailboat quilt has many different designs for the sails. Maybe, like me, you hadn’t noticed that at first?

The quilt shown below, with the tiny squares, is driving me crazy. I keep trying to figure out where the pattern begins and ends. Is it the four-square surrounded by the border of 12 little squares? But where do they begin or end?

Anyone who likes to read would love to have this bookshelf quilt hanging on their wall.

And then there is Gladys’s 150th birthday quilt of Canada’s provincial flowers. If you’ve forgotten which provinces the flowers represent, there is a link to click  which will take you back to a post in which this quilt was still a work in progress. Gladys has quilted maple leaf motifs all around the edge of the quilt in variegated metallic thread. Beautiful job!

For a close up look at the quilting on this one, click  the link below:

https://wordsfromanneli.com/2017/03/02/canadas-150-years/

Whispers Under the Baobab

Followers of Wordsfromanneli, please indulge me one more time. I know that some of you are aware of my second blog which I dedicate to books, authors, and writing, but in case you don’t know about my annelisplace blog, please come visit and if you are interested, follow me there as well. https://annelisplace.wordpress.com/

Anneli's Place

One of my favourite writers, Darlene Jones (yes, she’s the one on the camel) has just completed another book, “Whispers Under the Baobab.” It is a stand-alone sequel to her previous publication, “When the Sun was Mine.”  In this sequel,  the setting goes back and forth in time.  We are taken from the U.S. to Africa and back, to events that happened earlier in the life of award-winning journalist, Flo McAllister. When she died, Flo left a mystery behind. The story evolves as we try to decode her secret notes.

I’d like to share the author’s thoughts with you here. Welcome Darlene. What can you tell us about your new book, “Whispers Under the Baobab”?

Darlene Jones

It’s always exciting when “the book” is finally edited, formatted, and published. Holding the print copy in your hands never fails to make your heart beat a little faster. You’ve done it.

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The Happy Couple

Today’s post is probably going to be the last of the “doll series,” mainly because I don’t have any more dolls. This last pair is the oldest and came to our household about 1975 as a wedding gift brought back from Mexico by one of my sisters.

They both look a little bit in shock. The impact of the meaning of the word “lifetime” has just hit them.

After 42 years, her hands are swollen from all the hard work and her feet look sore. He has obviously been tearing his hair out, putting up with her, and his hands and feet are pretty clumpy too.

But they’re still together. They must have something good going on to make them stay.

When I Am Old

Several years ago, when I retired from teaching at my elementary school, the staff got together and did a little “tea party” for me as they usually did for retiring colleagues. They gave me a doll that had a special meaning, one which I had never heard of until they explained it to me. I’ve kept that doll with my Mexican marionettes and I think of my friends at work fondly when I look at it. This poem by Jenny Joseph explains what I didn’t know about retirement at that time.

When I Am Old

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat that doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me,
And I shall spend my pension
on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals,
and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I am tired,
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells,
And run my stick along the public railings,
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick the flowers in other people’s gardens,
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat,
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go,
Or only bread and pickle for a week,
And hoard pens and pencils and beer mats
and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry,
And pay our rent and not swear in the street,
And set a good example for the children.
We will have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me
are not too shocked and surprised,
When suddenly I am old
and start to wear purple!

Jenny Joseph

I guess I now belong to the Red Hat Society. One thing I’ve learned is that retirement is the best-kept secret ever! It has been a blast.

Music Makes Life Better

My Mexican band is not dressed in traditional mariachi style but they would do a fine job of singing for their supper on the beaches in that sunny land. With guitar, cymbals, maracas, and their beautiful voices, they can liven up everyone’s spirits.

They came to live with me when they heard that I had given a home to their friends, Annie and Mandelon, whom you may remember from my other post (The Mascot). Now Annie tells them which songs to play and Mandelon sweeps the house in time to their music.

Doesn’t he look like he’s hopping to the music? Housework is so much more fun when there’s good music to listen to.

And where is Annie? She’s busy at the moment  being Sylvia’s mascot in my novel “Orion’s Gift,” where she helps Sylvia find strength in facing some of the many scrapes she gets herself into. It’s good to have a friend, and until Sylvia finds the handsome Kevin, Annie is there for her to talk to.

For an exciting romantic suspense story with drama in Baja, why not have a look at Orion’s Gift. Click here: amazon.com

eBOOK_ORIONS_GIFT

Nose Prints on the Window

The rabbits know it’s spring. They’re doing what rabbits do, breeding like rabbits. The young ones are rather naive and often sit out in the open. Don’t they know there are eagles nesting in the trees close by? They will be wanting to feed their babies. Hasenpfeffer is one of their favourite meals.

And what about the owls that call at night? They’re hoping that when they call, “Who? Who?” a rabbit will be stupid enough to answer and say, “It’s me — Dumb Bunny.”

Hawks, owls, eagles — all are hoping for a meal of rabbit stew.

Bugsy is getting nervous and runs for  the hedge. “I’m out of sight. I can’t see any danger,” he thinks, with his juicy hindquarters sticking out for any passing predator to size up.

The worst, most dangerous predator of all is the English field cocker spaniel who is straining to get her nose through the window.

“I just want to play tag,” she says.

Losing It

Did you ever do something really stupid that made you wonder if old age is setting in early? I did! Today! I think I’m losing it!

We have a lot of windows in our house and they were in dire need of a cleaning after a winter of storms. I had been cleaning a few at a time over the last week, using a spray bottle of Windex, paper towels, and sometimes a squeegee.

Today I had a lot of things on my “To Do” list, so I rushed to get started. I grabbed the Windex and the paper towels and started on the living room windows.

I was surprised how much of a film remained on the window pane after I sprayed them and wiped them with the paper towel. I put it down to having neglected the job for too long, and rubbed harder with the towel so the panes finally came out clear. Emma’s nose prints on the glass didn’t help any. She likes to stick her nose into the window pane when she sees birds or rabbits in the yard outside.

In case you’re wondering why I have a photo of two spray bottles, it’s to show how similar the Windex bottle is to the one I accidentally grabbed in its place.

I had been cleaning my windows with Febreze! No wonder the panes were a bit filmy. But at least there is no doggie smell anywhere near the windows.

It’s easy enough to grab the wrong bottle when you’re in a hurry and don’t have your glasses on.  The Captain says I’d never be able to get a job as a caregiver. I’d have the residents keeling over from getting the wrong medicine.