wordsfromanneli

Thoughts, ideas, photos, and stories.

Moving Day

48 Comments

Usually we think of moving day as a marathon of packing up boxes and then calling muscular friends or a moving company to throw all the furniture and other belongings into a truck to take it all to the new house. But what if you found a real bargain of a “fixer-upper” and you had a small piece of land to put it on, but that place was farther up the coast from where you lived? Or maybe you wanted to turn the “fixer-upper” into a house to rent out.

These houses appear for sale now and then, parked on wooden blocks to hold up the house on each corner, on a loading area near our town. The houses are sold and then brought in by tug and barge to be taken away to another location, often another coastal area.

A truck with a long low platform drives under the raised up house which is then lowered onto the lowbed and driven onto a barge to be towed by the tug to its new location. The low bed is unhooked from the tractor and can be reconnected to another one for unloading at the destination. I can barely make out the wheels of the trailer under the house at the front of the barge.

This (above) was the scene looking out from my house one day, but I found an article in the Times-Colonist that showed pictures of other houses being moved by this method. The houses are not necessarily  all “fixer-uppers.” The circumstances could be quite different.

 

So if you like your house, but it’s not in the right location, you can now move the house instead of your belongings.  Or you can find a  house and have it moved up the coast to your property. For that matter, if you’re stranded on a desert island, you can just use your smart phone and order  a house to be brought in.

And maybe, if you have Amazon Prime you might save yourself the shipping charges. Ya think?

Author: wordsfromanneli

Writing, travel, photography, nature, more writing....

48 thoughts on “Moving Day

  1. That’s amazing, Anneli. I used to work for a company that made modular buildings. My specialty was day care centers. We built them in pieces, drove them down the hiway, and attached them on location. Something like this!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. These are amazing photos, Anneli! It’s weird to see a home floating along. One home barely cleared the bridge pilings, what a balancing act.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My great-grandfather moved houses in North Dakota when the railroad came through town. I can’t believe how big some of the houses are!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Just the idea of it is mind-boggling. I remember a house being brought to our neighbourhood when I was a child. I looked up and saw a house “driving” down the street. No barge involved that time as we lived far from the ocean but still, the idea of a house moving along the road ….
      Interesting that your great-grandfather moved houses. Sometimes our posts bring out little nuggets that we had almost forgotten and it’s fun to share them.

      Like

  4. It’s great to see them moved and put to further use instead of demolished.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I saw the occasional house being driven about in the prairie states, but to put one on a boat…wow.

    My house is staying firmly where it has been since the 1950s!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. You have to see this, to believe it!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. This has always amazed me, Anneli. I’ve seen historical buildings being moved as well. You have to see it to believe it.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. That is quite the view outside your window! Sure beats packing all those boxes 😏

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Thanks for this interesting story, Anneli. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Anneli, that is a whole new perspective on moving house! I love your post and images … it is impressive how they manage to move houses on land and water. This brings to mind how a whole town is on the move in Sweden! ‘Sweden’s northernmost town is on the move, building by building. Because of the risk posed by expanding mining operations, the entire town center of Kiruna is being relocated approximately two miles to the east.’ (Quote from Forbes) Approximately 6000 people will be relocated including major buildings, churches etc!

    haha … I laughed at your last sentence! Wonder if Amazon Prime will stretch to this!! 😀😀

    Liked by 1 person

  11. It is truly amazing what can be done these days. This could certainly be a great option for some people. Great photos, whether they are all yours or not. Interesting post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Sonja. I’d heard of houses being floated to and from remote outposts on the east coast in the old days, but it seems to be an ongoing enterprise nowadays on the west coast too. And yes, it is amazing what can be done. Can you imagine you and I doing this – trying to move a house over the water. And what if we were driving the low bed truck and hit a speed bump and knocked the house off its supports. Yikes! Every part of this operation takes skill and experience.

      Like

  12. For the first time in my life I see houses moved by the water. It looked amazing and it is an interesting way of life. You are able to have your own home totally with you.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Wow…this brings moving to a new level. No need to pack. No need to clean up for the new owner. This is definitely not travelling light.
    When I first read the title of your post, Anneli, I thought you’d be talking about the geese moving south. Here they are still hanging around. Too early, I guess. I love to hear them and watch them as they fly just over my building. Have a great week. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s what’s happening here too, Carol. Right over the house. Almost makes me want to run for an umbrella. But I love to hear them and see them so close. I guess soon it will be time to do a goose post.
      Have a good week yourself. Stay healthy.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. It is amazing to see those big houses being moved. I think this must be an expensive transport. But I like the idea of this, very practical.

    Like

  15. Dear Anneli
    We don’t know what to think about this kind of moving houses. Anyway, we love our house where it stands firm and unmovable.
    Wishing you an easy week
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I prefer solid and unmovable too, but there are communities, especially remote ones accessible mainly by water, where this is a sensible way to acquire a home. Often the materials for building a house are not easily available in these places and it makes sense to have a house brought in. For other cases, I’m not sure I could make a practical argument, but for remote locations, definitely. Thanks for your visit, KB. Have a great week.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I find this fascinating. When I was a little girl, walking down Burdick street, holding Grandma’s hand, a house drove by. It was on a land barge type thing and being pulled by a truck. I thought it was the most amazing thing I had ever seen. My grandmother seemed unfazed, and that makes me wonder if it used to be kind of common for that to happen.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I always thought the house would crumble if they tried to do that.It’s crazy to me.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. This is fascinating!! It reminds me of the classic children’s book “The Little House.”

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Pingback: Sunday Bookends: Too much depressing news, but also fun on birthday | Boondock Ramblings

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