wordsfromanneli

Thoughts, ideas, photos, and stories.


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Rocky Times

This part of the beach is very much to Emma’s liking. Sand is easier to run on than rocks.

Farther along, some giant hurled a handful of rocks onto the beach, to the north …

and to the south.

A closer look at some of them make me suspect that over thousands (maybe millions?) of years, some clumps of sand hardened into rocks like the one below. It’s a temporary resting place for the baby rock on its back, or maybe it’s on his face….

Do you see the face in this rock? A big slash for a mouth above the chin; a smooshed up nose; two puffy eyes; a scar that goes from his left eye to the right corner of his mouth; and a wart on his left cheek.

Yes, the maple leaf tells us we are in Canada. I’ll let you speculate what it means that the leaf is upside down just now. ( I didn’t touch it! That’s just the way it is.)

I must learn to be more like the old barnacles on the rock by the end of the maple leaf stem, and hang in there. Time marches on and things change. The tide comes in and the tide goes out. Maybe the next tide will flip the leaf over.

 


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Puppets from Long Ago

Although as adults we have never lived near each other, my brother and I have been close since we were babies. Now we are retired and still the best of friends.

In this picture, we are maybe five and three. We are at the local park in our town in Germany. At the time we had no idea that we would be living in Canada soon, and spend the rest of our lives being happy and grateful Canadian citizens.

But see the little puppets we are holding? These were our Kasper puppets. We played with them a lot, making up scenarios and imaginary plots.

I think they helped keep us out of trouble and kept our imaginations active, if not wild.

Did you know that the Kasper puppet character was first made popular in the 17th century? Kasper was like a German-speaking Punch who did some punching, but mostly he used a slapstick to punch the devil, or witch, or the crocodile, who were often the evil characters in his plays, where he promoted good behaviour. Punching the bad guy was acceptable in those days.

Here is the typical Kasper. I found this photo on the Wikipedia site, but couldn’t see whom to credit with the photo. My apologies to the photographer.

Looking more closely at our own Kasper puppets, I don’t think they look as scary as this traditional one.

We spent many a happy time playing with our Kasper puppets and I have fond memories of those childhood days.

Did you ever have a puppet or make up puppet plays?

IMPORTANT NOTE!!!

For the month of July, my novels will be half price on www.smashwords.com You can also go to my webpage www.anneli-purchase.com and find out all about the novels before clicking on the link to smashwords  (or amazon) on that webpage.

Smashwords is good for all e-readers as well as paperback.

If you prefer to buy from amazon, the novels will be available for Kindle there, and in paperback, of course.

*The Wind Weeps remains free, but be sure to get the sequel, Reckoning Tide. All novels other than the FREE one are priced at a bargain $1.50.  


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Gold River

From 1967 to 1998, the town of Gold River on the west coast of Vancouver Island bustled with activity. Then the pulp and paper mill shut down and it became almost a ghost town.

It’s a tidy town, clean and organized, but there are not even enough people left to support a large grocery store. Two small general stores provide the basics and not much more. The civic centre and police station and two schools are all modern and neat, as if they came right out of a picture book.

Several miles out of town, we found much more activity. A mermaid welcomed us to the wharf area.

Although the mill was shut down, in the remote forests around the Gold River area, logging is still going on. It leaves ugly scars for a while, but the regenerated forests do have their positive effects, providing more sunlight for smaller shrubs and trees which make better food and hiding places for small animals. You can see the new growth in sections that were cut in previous years.

Logging trucks bring the cut logs to a sorting yard near the wharf outside of Gold River.

They are then rolled down the embankment into the salt water, to be put into sections according to type and possibly by size by the dozer boats you see in the photo. They push the logs into the appropriate partitions, ready for loading onto ocean-going ships.

Without the pulp and paper mill, the logs are sent out to other countries to be processed further.

It’s sad to see the mill in ruins. Eventually it will be dismantled.

Meanwhile, the town and the coastal inlets are  destinations for eco tours and sightseeing trips by boat or by plane.

A small float plane company has set up shop near the wharf. It serves those who want a tour by air, and provides transportation for loggers flying to jobs in even more remote areas of the coast.  As well, air freight is a quick way to bring in supplies and parts for machinery that may have broken down.

Here is the grand office of the seaplane service.

Book your ticket and fly on this float plane.

We had our truck so we made our way back by land this time.


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Man or Nature?

So many times when I’ve stood on my deck and tried to take a photo of the water, I’ve cursed the hydro pole that mars the view.

This time I found the power lines an interesting contrast to the lines created by the tidal movement in the bay.

I still find the man-made power lines to be ugly, but here they emphasize the beauty of  the soft curvy lines of nature.

Man or nature? For me, it’s no contest.


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Pacific Tree Frog

This little Pacific tree frog was so small that at first sight I thought he was a beetle. Then he moved and I saw that he had legs and had no resemblance to a beetle except his size, which I guess to be about 3 centimeters at the most, or just under 1 and 1/2 inches. I love those little pads on his toes that help him get a grip.

He looks like he’s wearing a jogging suit with that racing stripe around his nose and eyes.

Did you know he can change his colour from green to mottley green/brown to brown?

It was thought at first that tree frogs change colour according to their environment (for camouflage) but in fact it is triggered by background brightness set off by seasonal changes. Some changes in colour can be noticeable within a few hours but complete colour change can take weeks or months.

 

I’m watching out for garter snakes,

If you should see one, heaven’s sakes,

Do warn me in a timely way,

In case of danger, I can’t stay.

I know you do not see a crown,

I dropped it, so just look around,

And you will figure out my hints–

Inside me lives a tiny prince.


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More “Whatever-they-are”s

A few years ago, I saw only brown llamas or alpacas in our neighbourhood. The other day as I drove down to the spit to take pictures of the seiners at the wharf, I passed the “llama place” and was surprised to see only one brown one.
I think this black one is new – at least “new” to me. Its buddies were of assorted colours.

I had to wonder though, if this brown one is one of the originals. They didn’t have name tags, and they wouldn’t answer when I asked. I guess it’s because they were busy eating.

This is their view. Pretty nice place to have lunch, on a little hillside by the sea. Life could be worse.

Alpaca or llama

Oh what a dilemma,

I wish I could tell,

But then, “Oh what the …heck.”


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Herring Time 2019

Two years ago to the day I did a post about the herring fishery. If you are interested you can find it here. https://wordsfromanneli.com/2017/03/08/herring-time/

At that time a fisherman lost his life working in this dangerous job.

However, the fishery goes on. The pressure is on the fishermen to set their nets and catch what they can in the short time allowed.

As seiners from all along the coast of BC gather to await the herring opening, the wharf at Comox, on Vancouver Island, is congested at this time of year. You can see the seiners in the center of the photo above in the government fish wharf, and the toothpick-like masts of the sailboats on the far right, tucked away in their private marina.

How do these boats not get tangled!?

At one time the herring fishery was lucrative, but see, below, the problem facing the herring fishermen now.

These are a few of the sea lions left after a herring season three years ago. Since then the number of sea lions has exploded to the point where the fishermen lose nets repeatedly from dozens of these giants tearing through them to get at the herring in the seine nets.

Every animal needs to eat, but the fishermen are now finding it difficult to make a living when all they seem to do is feed sea lions and pay for very expensive nets. The staggering number of sea lions that have moved in to take up permanent residence on the coast of Vancouver Island has become an overwhelming problem for the fishermen.

Solutions are hard find, as the remedies are all controversial.