Tag Archives: sewing

The Dreaded Post-Christmas Pounds

People are not the only ones who put on a pound or two over the holidays. It happens to our pets, too.
This morning the Captain took Emma, our field cocker spaniel, to a nearby farm to hunt for ducks. This photo is from yesterday, when we were just out for a walk. Ducks were everywhere.
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Ruby, the springer spaniel, was upset that she didn’t get to go. Nearly 12 years old, she’s almost completely deaf now, but she still knew she was being left behind. She felt better after I gave her a little treat and pulled  her doggie bed right beside me by the laptop.
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Last night when the Captain was getting things ready for this morning’s outing, he hauled out the little neoprene vest I made for Emma a couple of years ago.
“You’d better try it on her,” I said. “She’s put on a couple of pounds.” (After all, it’s just after Christmas).
Sure enough, it was VERY snug.
“You can’t have her wear that. She won’t be able to breathe.”
I looked high and low and luckily found a piece of left over neoprene  (from the old wet suit that I had used to make the vest).
I cut a 1 1/2 inch strip the length of Emma’s suit. It didn’t take long to cut the suit and sew in the strip. With a zigzag stitch and the piece butted up to the edges it was easy to insert a strip. No need to overlap neoprene to make a seam. Just laying the edges snugly side by side and zigzagging them together works fine.
You can see the post I did about the original vest a couple of years
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Here she is in the original vest.
I was going to take a picture of Emma in her expanded vest to put at the end of this post, but I was shocked to learn that she came home without it.
It’s lost! Somewhere out there in the brambles it got hooked up, the velcro parted, and there the vest stayed.
In the next day or so we’ll have to launch a search party for it.

The Curse of the Camisoles

My mother-in-law had a box of my novels delivered to her place  while I was away in Montana. When I got home, I got the Captain to collect it and bring it home.

I was looking for scraps of paper to start a fire in the woodstove and noticed some tissue paper on the box of books. Might as well burn that. It would be perfect for starting the kindling.

That evening, m-i-l phoned and said she had sent two camisoles over for me to fix for her.

“Oh? I didn’t see any camisoles,” I told her. 

“They were wrapped in tissue paper.”

A heat wave swept over me, hotter than the fire I had made with the tissue paper. Could I really have burned those camisoles? Wouldn’t I have noticed that something was inside the paper?  I looked all over the house for camisoles wrapped in tissue paper and finally phoned m-i-l back. 

“I must have made a fire with them when I was burning papers. But I don’t know how I wouldn’t have noticed them.”

“Well … they’re very thin …,” she said. “But don’t worry about it.”

About a week later, my m-i-l phoned. “Guess what I found? Wrapped in tissue paper between two blouses in my dresser drawer.” 

We both laughed with relief. She’s nearly 97 and is allowed to have a senior moment now and then. But my laughing stopped short when I realized, Oh no. Now I still have to do the sewing repairs. 

Okay, well bring them over when you come for supper next time. DON’T wrap them in tissue paper. Just throw them into a plastic bag. Then I won’t try to make a fire with them.”

And that is what she did. She put them in a plastic bag and I had them in my hand the day she came over for supper.  I was very busy getting the meal on the table and putting food  away into the fridge.

The next day, the cursed camisoles were nowhere to be found.

I searched the house thoroughly three times from top to bottom. No camisoles anywhere and I had no excuse to have a senior moment.

Two days ago,  I took my m-i-l shopping, and bought her two new camisoles.

This morning, the Captain was making a sandwich and called out to me, “ANNELI! Guess what I found.”

“No idea. What?”

“I was looking for lettuce to put on my sandwich, and you know how you always wrap it in a paper towel and put it in a plastic bag? Well, just come and see.”

One bag has lettuce in it, and the other has … you guessed it … two camisoles.

And as much as I was relieved to find the cursed things, the next thought that popped into my mind was, Arrrgh…. Now I have to repair them after all.

I have decided to do that, and then quietly put them into m-i-l’s Christmas stocking (wrapped in tissue paper, the way she likes it).

Stitches by the Sea

This is the last set of quilts in this series of posts showing quilts from the Cumberland Quilt Show. The photos here are all from the same quilt which uses one of my favourite themes, the sea and life by the sea. I’m sorry I don’t know the name of the quilter to give her credit.

The features are appliqued and stitched on with a variety of stitches, which make it a work of art in itself. Notice the quilting of the water in the shape of waves. Decorative stitches of  varying lengths and widths make the applique job more interesting. It’s in the details. You may want to click to enlarge the photos for a better look at the stitching.

Quilt Show in Cumberland, BC

The local quilting guild  put on a quilt show on the long weekend in May. I tried to snap a few pictures and here are four of them.  Some of the visitors inadvertently became part of this post. Hard to take a picture of the quilts in a crowded room. More photos to come in future blog posts.

This sailboat quilt has many different designs for the sails. Maybe, like me, you hadn’t noticed that at first?

The quilt shown below, with the tiny squares, is driving me crazy. I keep trying to figure out where the pattern begins and ends. Is it the four-square surrounded by the border of 12 little squares? But where do they begin or end?

Anyone who likes to read would love to have this bookshelf quilt hanging on their wall.

And then there is Gladys’s 150th birthday quilt of Canada’s provincial flowers. If you’ve forgotten which provinces the flowers represent, there is a link to click  which will take you back to a post in which this quilt was still a work in progress. Gladys has quilted maple leaf motifs all around the edge of the quilt in variegated metallic thread. Beautiful job!

For a close up look at the quilting on this one, click  the link below:

https://wordsfromanneli.com/2017/03/02/canadas-150-years/

The Nightgown Shapeshifters

Flannel on the clothesline

Sheds the dusty coat

Gathered in the fabric store,

All those tiny motes.

Filtered sunlight and a breeze

Scent of cedar from the trees.

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Quickly! No one’s looking now.

Let them stand and wonder how

The seamstress waves her magic wand.

Of nightgowns she is very fond.

Scrunch together, stretch again,

And two new shapes, now remain.

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Shapeshifters, you can take a bow,

And sleep in cozy dreamland  now.

Return of the Bag Lady

I’m still working on improving my handbags. None is perfect, but each one is unique and fun to make. Last count I think I had made about 15 bags and have given most of them away. I really enjoy making them because I never know how they’ll look when they’re done. Each one is different. Often they are made with scraps of interesting material – small pieces that are not much good for larger projects but are perfect for patchwork.

Making the bags gets easier each time. The bag on the left was more expensive than the others. It cost me two broken sewing machine needles when I was impatiently “driving” over the heavier parts.

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I just finished the brown one today and am already wondering what the next bag will look like.

Quilt Show in Comox

Last weekend I volunteered on behalf of the Schoolhouse Quilters’ Guild at the Comox Valley Exhibition. It was inspiring to see the  various creations of other quilters. The quilts were displayed on panels of black cloth hung on structures made especially for displays of this sort.
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I’ve chosen a few of the quilts for this blog. I would like to have featured them all, but there simply isn’t the space to do that.

I like the way the quilter of this piece used the quilting lines to show the contours of the landscape.

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These two wall hangings are hand  quilted. That’s a lot of work when it could have been done by machine, but the hand quilting gives them a special look and is more difficult to do exactly, and much more time consuming. Great care is taken to make sure that each stitch is the same length.
DSCN6356 The mermaid below is done by machine quilting. It doesn’t show up on my photo, but the mermaid’s hair is quilted in two colours of thread, one dark, one light, which give her hair a highlighted look. The scales on her body are not part of the pattern of the fabric; they are quilted on. Notice, too, the stitching lines that give the impression of the movement of the water.DSCN6349 One of my favourites is this sunflower quilt. In better lighting it would be glittering and sparkling, but it was hanging in a darker corner and so couldn’t be seen to its best advantage.DSCN6367 Again, the stitching lines show the contours of the landscape. Excellent job!DSCN6368 This jellyfish quilt has little lights sewn into it which can be switched on at the back of the quilt. But even without the lights, the work is very good.DSCN6370 And what’s not to love about “Oh Canada”? The applique of all the animals on the map must have taken a lot of time.DSCN6366After putting in my time at the exhibition, I couldn’t wait to get home and fire up my sewing machine.