Retreat – Stepping Back

In mid-October I took a step back – a retreat from the usual day-to-day living – to a beautiful location on Quadra Island, a short ferry ride from Campbell River on Vancouver Island. The occasion was the semi-annual quilting retreat for the local quilting guild.

Four days of sewing and camaraderie, in which we had no cooking or cleaning to do. Just sew and go for a walk now and then between rain showers.

The buildings are old, but the natural scenery is older and for the most part, unchanged. It was a very quiet and beautiful spot.

The quilters each bring their sewing machines and fabrics, and all their tools and supplies needed to complete their planned projects. I had several unfinished projects, and by the end of the four days, I felt I had accomplished a lot.

One of the things I did was to take the ill-fitting squares I had made a couple of years ago and try to use them in some other way. The quilt I had intended them for was not working out but I had already done so much work on the tiny red and white squares, and on the appliqued birds and flowers.

I decided on place mats and pieced them together in whatever way the squares would fit, patching places that were odd sizes.

The result was four place mats and one table center, good enough for my own table for everyday meals.

It felt good to use up the unfinished project pieces and I was happy with the results. Now all they need is a meal to be served on them.


Comox Valley Exhibition – Quilts

Some of you may remember that my friend Gladys entered her quilt in a local show in May. She has shown  it again this past week in the Comox Valley Exhibition. It has ribbons beside it now for Best of Show. So much intricate work went into the making of this quilted wall hanging. Each of the flowers represents a province or territory of Canada. Gladys made the quilt in honour of Canada’s 150th birthday. Congratulations to Gladys on her well-deserved ribbons.I’m sorry I don’t know much of the story behind the other quilts but I can admire them for their creators’ skill and imagination. The second prize quilt is featured here (below). I must mention that there were several categories so there is probably another 2nd prize quilt as well, but I can only show you the ones I  photographed.

Third prize is a clothesline with individual tiny quilts hanging on the line.

Another category’s 3rd prize winner is the cow quilt below.

The show had so many quilts I couldn’t possibly post them all, but you have a glimpse of what the exhibition had to offer. It was a feast for the eyes.

Stitches by the Sea

This is the last set of quilts in this series of posts showing quilts from the Cumberland Quilt Show. The photos here are all from the same quilt which uses one of my favourite themes, the sea and life by the sea. I’m sorry I don’t know the name of the quilter to give her credit.

The features are appliqued and stitched on with a variety of stitches, which make it a work of art in itself. Notice the quilting of the water in the shape of waves. Decorative stitches of  varying lengths and widths make the applique job more interesting. It’s in the details. You may want to click to enlarge the photos for a better look at the stitching.

More Quilts

Again I apologize for the clipped edges and odd angles of the quilt photos. At the Cumberland Quilt Show, I was trying to snap pictures over people’s heads, and to isolate some quilts that were hanging close to others.

The quilt below is a bargello, showing yet again the many possibilities of this art. Notice how the strips are narrower as the design is close to the peaks and valleys and wider as the curve is not as steep.

In the small works group, the challenges may vary. In the next two quilts, done by the same person, the challenge was to incorporate five circles and the element of water. These houses are on the canals of Amsterdam.

The quilt below has many textures, stitch types, piecing, and applique. The challenge was to tell a story. This one is of collecting things, an activity the quilter and the chickadee have in common.

Painting with thread? Who would have thought it possible? Add the geometric design that evolves from the direction and path of the thread and you have a wonderful work of art.

Dandelions can be beautiful too. This one involved a lot of tying off of threads at the ends of each “fuzz.” Notice the centers of some of the flowers. Those are buttons. When they are fastened to the back of the fabric it creates a tiny 3-D effect.

 

Have I inspired you yet to try your hand at quilting?

Quilt Show in Cumberland, BC

The local quilting guild  put on a quilt show on the long weekend in May. I tried to snap a few pictures and here are four of them.  Some of the visitors inadvertently became part of this post. Hard to take a picture of the quilts in a crowded room. More photos to come in future blog posts.

This sailboat quilt has many different designs for the sails. Maybe, like me, you hadn’t noticed that at first?

The quilt shown below, with the tiny squares, is driving me crazy. I keep trying to figure out where the pattern begins and ends. Is it the four-square surrounded by the border of 12 little squares? But where do they begin or end?

Anyone who likes to read would love to have this bookshelf quilt hanging on their wall.

And then there is Gladys’s 150th birthday quilt of Canada’s provincial flowers. If you’ve forgotten which provinces the flowers represent, there is a link to click  which will take you back to a post in which this quilt was still a work in progress. Gladys has quilted maple leaf motifs all around the edge of the quilt in variegated metallic thread. Beautiful job!

For a close up look at the quilting on this one, click  the link below:

https://wordsfromanneli.com/2017/03/02/canadas-150-years/

Bargello

A few months ago I had never heard of “bargello” but it has been fun learning about it. “Bargello” is a quilting term that refers to a zigzag motif similar to a design found on some chairs in an old fortress (they call it a palace) in Florence, Italy. The Bargello Palace is now a museum, and in it you can find these chairs with the zigzag design in the seat and back coverings.

Some bargello designs are made with needlepoint, but quilters can also make a design that reflects the bargello style. Recently I went to a workshop to learn more about quilting a bargello.

The options are endless, but traditionally the colours are supposed to go from dark to light for that special effect. I did not go out shopping for well-matched colours, but used scraps of what I had. For learning how to do the process, I thought it would work well enough. Others in the workshop had much better colour matches and the effect was much more dramatic.

The process is basically this:

You lay out your strips of cloth using two sets of colours going from light to dark.

Sew the strips together. You even sew the last strip to the first one to make a tube.

Turn the  tube sideways and cut into strips again.

Lay them out in a zigzag design that you find pleasing, opening up the top seams for the full length of the strip again. You can see this on some of the samples of designs that other quilters came up with.

The strips will be sewn together and evened out at the top and bottom, then batting and backing and binding is added to finish the quilt.

The possibilities are endless.