wordsfromanneli

Thoughts, ideas, photos, and stories.

Birds at Vernon Lake

42 Comments

We parked our trailer and unloaded the skiff to have it ready for use at the edge of Vernon Lake.

The campsite was visited by many birds. Here are only a few of them. Many stayed hidden though they sang their hearts out all day.

This is a hairy woodpecker. I thought at first it was a downy, which looks very similar, but the hairy woodpecker has a much heavier and longer beak than the downy.

One of the birds I heard a lot, was Swainson’s thrush. I love the song he sings, “You’re pretty, you’re pretty, oh really.” But he is very elusive and I couldn’t get a photo of him.

He’s a very plain version of an immature robin but without any hint of black or red. If you click on this link you’ll see a photo on the bird site: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Swainsons_Thrush/id

Next to visit, was a Steller’s jay, but I almost mistook him for something else. He is a bit pale and scruffy, and this has me wondering if it is an immature bird.

Below, we have the red-breasted sapsucker, probably the very one I took pictures of for a previous post. He was hanging around the campsite the whole time we were there.

And no wonder! He has already made quite an investment in this tree, sipping sap and nabbing insects.

But do you see what I see? Circling the tree just below the chipped bark is a nasty looking petrified snake. I think he’s guarding the dinner table for the sapsucker.

You won’t see me trying to get near him. He looks mean. Is that blood on his lips?

Author: wordsfromanneli

Writing, travel, photography, nature, more writing....

42 thoughts on “Birds at Vernon Lake

  1. What a beautiful spot and birds too! Excellent photos, Anneli.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great photos. I hope you have a good weekend. The weather looks a little misty. I am on my way back to the Okanagan today.

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    • Loads of cherries happening there, I bet. Have fun.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m more looking forward to the break but all the fruit is a real bonus!

        Liked by 1 person

        • It’s pretty there at this time of year, right into the fall. Winters, I won’t thank you for, but the rest of the year, the Okanagan is pretty nice.

          Liked by 1 person

          • After the north, Okanagan winters are positively balmy. Shorts weather. 😉

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            • I suppose if you were far enough north (and I believe you said you were), it would be better in the Okanagan, but I’ve seen the wind coming sideways, blowing snow, and the fruit trees looking gnarly and ugly as they do in winter. It’s very different from the rest of the year when it’s absolutely gorgeous there. But I believe you’ve been toughened up for OK winters. This summer visit should be quite nice for you.

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              • I work north of sixty, where it’s very typical for temps to go to -40C. -45 to -50 are somewhat unusual but I’ve experienced that as well. I always walk to work and my eyelashes will freeze when it’s that cold. I’ve also lived on the prairies where -35 is pretty normal, too, so the Okanagan winters are pretty easy after that! It does get grey, though, socked in pretty hard for weeks at a time.

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                • That is definitely cold. The worst I’ve experienced was when I lived in Dawson Creek for ten years, and one night it went down to -53. By morning when it was time to walk to school it had warmed up to -43. But that was unusual even for there. I can see how it would seem mild to deal with -20 or so. Good thing we don’t have to worry about it all year round.

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  3. Such a beautiful place, Anneli! So many birds, wow. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  4. How beautiful. Nature at work. Thanks for this, Anneli.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks for the wonderful pictures, Anneli!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Jill. I wish I could have the camera with me every minute of the day so I wouldn’t miss so many nice shots, but some of them just have to live in my head rather than in the camera. I was glad to get what I did.

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  6. What a beautiful place! Nice photos. I love birds. We have a variety of them here!

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    • I’m happy to hear that you have lots of birds. I hope to make people aware of them with my posts, and to try to take care to protect them.

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      • We used to see a larger variety about 10 years ago or so. But we have a feral cat living here that the neighbors also feed. So not as many now which is sad. But still owls, hawks, doves, finches, and those pesky woodpeckers who fill up the telephone line box with acorns!

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        • That is what happened to the many quails and pheasants we used to have around our place. People dropped off kittens in the treed area where we live, thinking it was a humane thing to do (and easier than paying for vet bills), and others let their dogs run loose, and that was the end of the quail and pheasants here. Ground birds have a hard time surviving here. The rest fare better. Sad to see the numbers decline though.

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  7. Such a beautiful place Anneli… Did it rain there? The place looks so rain kissed. I feel a place looks its best when it is rain kissed.. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. These species definitely bring back memories of Tahsis for me! As does the cloud across the mountain. No petrified snakes encircling trees there though. Did see a lot of northwestern garters.

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  9. Beautiful pictures and a beautiful place to stay!

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  10. Lots of birds and such beautiful surroundings- what a nice getaway!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Anneli, I find it amazing how wonderful your bird photos are. Just so gorgeous. And that first photo lured me in. I wished I were there. Sigh.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Luanne. I love being able to zoom in on birds to catch them when they don’t know they’re being photographed. I’m aware that I lose something by doing the zoom thing, but my camera doesn’t take the big lenses that I’d like to have on there. It’s what they call a bridging camera (I guess they mean it’s something in between the beginner and the really pro cameras), and that is probably all I can handle for now. I’d love to have one that shows every bit of detail, but that’s for “down the road” sometime. Meanwhile, I’m having fun with this one. I’m pleased that you like the photos.

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  12. Reblogged this on By the Mighty Mumford and commented:
    OH TO GO BIRDING!!!!! KNOWING WHAT ONE HEARS AND SEES!

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