wordsfromanneli

Thoughts, ideas, photos, and stories.


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Keremeos

My apologies for a whole series of posts with photos taken as we whizzed past in the truck and trailer, but in this post, I hope to convey a feeling more than to show any particular fantastic photo.

Going through the little town of Keremeos in the South Okanagan, in spite of the chilly fall air, we are always warmed by the festive attitude of the residents. It’s harvest time, and rather than have scarecrows, they have straw people all through the downtown area. I wish I could have done them justice with less blurry shots, but you’ll get the idea of the fun on the streets of this fruit growing town.

Can you find the straw people? Two in this photo.

 

One here.

Two here.

Two here.

One here.

All seem to be pointing to the fruit markets that line the road farther along.

Did you know that pumpkins are a tasty vegetable when prepared as you would any other squash?

This is pumpkin time, as well as onions, garlic, and winter apple time.

Squashes and cauliflowers, melons and tomatoes.

And if you don’t feel like shopping but just want to stop for a bit and let the kids play in the park, the local quail welcomes you. He’s like the quail version of “Big Bird.” Can you see him there to the left of the big tree with the yellow leaves?

Here is a close up of him – although very blurry – to help you find him.

The Okanagan is full of quail, quite tiny wild chicken-like birds that have so many cute habits it’s a shame to kill them for food (although I must admit, they are SO tasty).

I love quail, dead (on my plate) or alive (in my backyard), but mostly alive.

This “Big Bird” put a long-lasting smile on my face as we drove through Keremeos.

 


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Happy Easter

Why do rabbits paint Easter eggs? Where do they get them? Do they steal them from the chickens’ nesting boxes? I suppose it wouldn’t be impossible for them to come up with a paintbrush somewhere – maybe some feathers lost by a bird. They might make colours for painting by chewing different plants or their flowers and spitting out the juice onto a rock and dipping the “brush” in. Most of the painting party would have to take place at night – first to make it easier to steal the eggs, and second, to have the whole warren pitch in and work on the painting while the dogs (Emma and Ruby) are sleeping in the house.

I see that one of the eggs is of alabaster. It has been part of the collection for more than 40 years. An inexpensive little something bought at a shop in Vancouver. A quail has contributed an egg to the plate. One of its babies was not going to hatch, so its shell is like a commemorative to the little guy. The four faded eggs were painted by my friends Yana and Yosef when they were about 8 or 9 years old. They’re about 32 now. The more brightly coloured eggs, were done by professional rabbits in the Czech Republic more than 20 years ago. These eggs are all resting on an authentic Czech plate that has holes in it. You might be able to see the holes beside the quail egg or to the top right of the green egg. It’s part of the fancy design of the dish that we fondly refer to as a soup plate.

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I’m glad that the rabbits painted these Easter eggs. I don’t usually think of these fluffy critters in a kindly light. No gardener would!  I’ll forgive them this time because of the hard work they do at Easter time, but my goodwill won’t last long. Once in a while I have to get my revenge on them  by eating one of their chocolate cousins, just to teach them a lesson.

Happy Easter!