A Sunny Cloud

Early in the morning, the sun’s first rays hit the top of the hills and one lonely leftover cloud. I’ve learned keep the camera handy and to drop everything when the light is right. Sure enough, less than a minute later, the light changed and the magic was gone.

Cloud Talk

 

I didn’t have the heart to add

Another drop of rain

With all the cloudbursts you have had

It could become a pain.

 

I’d rather brighten up your day

With promises of joy

For drought relief, a price you pay

Too much rain can annoy.

 

One Sunny Day

Yesterday the sun came out from behind the clouds for a little while. Its rays seemed to spotlight the willow tree in my neighbours’ yard. In the early spring it begins to get buds that signal that winter is (or should be) over.

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I had to get a close up of these pussywillows. They are so representative of spring. I felt a hopeful anticipation of warmer days to come.

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It can’t be long now…. Can it?

Have you seen any signs of spring where you live?

Cold Sunshine

The Captain and I had to make a trip up island the other day. It would be a long day so we took a picnic lunch and stopped by the roadside on the way home. Where we parked, several picnic benches were available but there was a chance our rear ends could freeze to the bench, so we stayed in the car where it was cozy. We had a fantastic view, sunshine, and the warmth of the car while we had our sandwiches and V-8 juice.

This was the view looking north towards Campbell River, on Vancouver Island. You can see the south end of town on the left, and in the distance you can see the snow-covered Coast Range which is on the BC mainland.

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Looking straight ahead from the comfort of our car, this was the view we had while we ate our lunch. These mountains are also part of the Coast Range, on the BC mainland.

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The waters were calm and the sun was shining, but it was hard to find a warm spot. Who knew that sunshine could be so cold?

Turning Seasons

The colours of fall are amazing. As we drove through Montana on our way back to the coast, the brown hills near Missoula impressed us with their brilliant deciduous growth in the valley bottoms.

Even before learning the name of the huge trees with almost black bark, I have loved the look of the black cottonwoods. In Montana’s ever-present breeze the leaves whisper soothingly. It does the soul good just to stand quietly under one of these trees, close your eyes and listen.

I don’t know what the red shrubs are that don’t mind getting their feet wet in the creeks and rivers, but I saw the same shrubs growing in the small waterways of southern British Columbia as we drove home. dscn7290If I were a painter, I wouldn’t hesitate to set up my easel here.dscn7288Or here! I love the white bark on the trees below. Are they birch? Poplar? I don’t know, but they’re beautiful.

Notice how yellow and brown the grass is. It’s usually fairly dry here.dscn7296

Now see how green the grass is in the photo below. We are on the coast and the wet weather reminds us that we’re nearly home. That tree floating in the bay is a Douglas fir that was washed away from the banks of the river and has floated all the way into the estuary. It was a very tall tree, although it may be hard to tell from the photo. I later saw this same tree in a video clip someone posted to the weather network.

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Just a couple more miles to home. We’ve driven past flooded fields and a cresting river. So glad we live on high ground.

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What is it?

It looks like a comet, but it’s not. It looks like a splotch on the truck window or the camera lens, but it’s not. As I drove past, I had to admit that the thing that might have been a sun with a halo,… wasn’t …

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unless there are two suns. Maybe it’s a mini rainbow on the edge of a cloud?dscn6506

The Deluge

Two nights ago at 2:50 a.m. the loudest crack of thunder I have ever heard split the sky outside our house. The dogs leaped off their beds, barking at the weather gods. Huge volumes of water poured down in a short time. After a week of  hot weather, the change was dramatic. The next day again, we had buckets of rain in short cloudbursts.

Today I thought I lived in Panama, the way the rain came down in streams.

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Our soil is sandy, so any water that comes down soaks away quickly, but so much water came down in such a short time that part of the yard looked like the Great Lakes.

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Remember my garden being built in April?

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Just look at it now. All it needed was for the weather gods to do their thing.003 004

That, and a little bit of (back-breaking) work.

PS

Pit, from Texas, sent links to the “deluges” that came his way earlier this year.

http://tinyurl.com/n84nvmv

http://tinyurl.com/konvtno

http://tinyurl.com/k5n6d47

Like a Lamb

This year, March came in “like a lion,” as any herring fisherman will tell you.

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They must have had some terrible days even in these relatively sheltered waters. I know I would be so seasick if I had to be out there.

But at the end of March I took some pictures of the same area and it was a very different story. It was early morning and the sun would be creeping over the horizon momentarily. Its warm glow already lit up the few stragglers of the clouds that had blown through overnight.

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It was still  early, but when I looked more closely, I saw a partial yellow globe.

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No, it’s not the sun. That’s the waning moon. The sun was rising far to the east of it, shining on the clouds around the moon. In the stillness of the dawn the sun sent poetry rays to me:

“Oh Moon, I guess you think you’re cool

To sashay round that cloud,

But keep on moving, you old fool,

While I shine warm and proud.”

The next day, also early in the morning (I’m out there because that’s when the dogs have to go out), the sun was rolling up its sleeves, ready to get to work and warm this corner of the earth. I welcomed it and told it to stay as long as it wanted.

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In these last days of the month, March truly went out “like a lamb.”